Friday, August 10, 2012

Garden Inventory

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Getting ready to dig in.  This view is from the far left side of the center walkway.

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First time I've planted Echinacea in white.  I adore it.

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Front view of garden left side.

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Foxgloves.  Not as glorious and tall as the blossoms when I first planted, but no complaints.

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Echinacea, freshly planted.

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This is Guara.  Had never seen or heard of this plant.  It is airy and explosive all at once, and I want to run away with it and get married.  It is perfection.  Have 3 more now after witnessing it's showy nature.

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Deep gorgeous, and not green.  The name escapes me now....they turn really red in the fall.... Bayberry maybe?

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Drooping Blue Spruce affectionately called the Charlie Brown tree by the kids.

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Crepes Myrtles are their typical out of control selves along the center walk.  They drive Jeff crazy.  Which I have to admit might make me love them more.  I'm like that.

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Front view of garden right side.  Waiting for a fresh layer of compost/soil/mulch.  We get ours here.

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My mama gave me a few plantings of Shasta Daisy several years ago, and this fall it'll be time to divide and spread the love once again.  They simply take over, and are about waist high.

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Tickseed (errhhh Blanket flower!).  Lovely at all stages before, during and after blooming.

(A kind commenter pointed this out to be Blanket Flower- the labels on the pots when I bought them read tickseed/blanket flower - So I've been confused ever since.  I have seen some coreopsis (tickseed) to look like this, but not with such poofy centers.  But I think she's right- they are two different things!)

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Have not had the best luck w hydrangeas, but so far the newly chosen spot under a Sycamore tree seems to be doing the trick for four new varieties.

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Hosta. Loveya.

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And some new colors of Encore Azalea.

This weekend, I'll be dropping Zinnia and Poppy seeds all over.
Can't wait.  A full slideshow over here.
good weekend! xo, Anna

24 comments:

  1. Your garden is beautiful, so much color. Mine is overgrown and the flowers are gone. I have been weeding which is not my favorite thing to do, but things look so much better when they are tidy.
    Hugs,
    Meredith

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  2. Beautiful! If I ever get so lucky that I'll have my own garden, I'll definitely plant that Guara all over the place! Love it!

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  3. Love the photos..flowers have always been my favorite things to photograph..they dont have fly away hairs...they dont blink..they're never self conscious and always graceful! :) Thank you for sharing...darling images!

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  4. I love guara too. Although the location we had it years ago didn't work well; they ended up getting way overgrown and looking a bit weedy. Husband wasn't a fan, so we removed them.

    The crepe myrtle! I love them and have five throughout our landscape. I prefer the trunks well pruned, so they're crazy big on top and look so architectural on the bottom. They have such pretty legs. I'm tempted to wait until dark and prune all of my neighbors' unkept myrtles, in fact. I don't want to be that woman and I wouldn't probably ever actually do it, but it's nice to dream.

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  5. Beautiful garden! I think the name of the purple soon to be red shrub is loropetalum.

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  6. So lovely! I love flowers and wish to have a garden that full of flowers. I hope to have soil space and extra time to plant.
    great job! It looks there's a magic in your hands.

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  7. It never occurred to me to plant echinacea. I love echinacea tea, and for some reason, it's hard to find! Thank you for the idea!!

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  8. Lovely! Your purplish bush looks like the loropetalum we have in our yard- it gets nice fringe-y pink flowers too!

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  9. Wow! Those are really stunning blooms. I love the vibrant colors it brings in your garden. Great job! They are all lovely.

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  10. So you plant your poppy seeds at the end of summer? Maybe I'll try that, I haven't had any luck planting them in the spring! Wonderful garden, just gorgeous!

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  11. Do I dare? That "tickseed" is actually blanket flower, or gaillardia, and I'd guess it to be the Goblin one. The latin for tickseed is coreopsis, and is also a beautiful flower that can bloom all summer.

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  12. Hi Laura- the tag on the plant, called it Tickseed/Blanket flower! I though the same thing and could not figure out why they labeled it as a coreopsis.... any chance that it is?

    xo, Anna

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  13. Elizabeth- I usually plant them towards the beginning of spring, but spent a lot of time amending soil this spring.summer, so I am hoping for a later crop of wildflowers. We have another two or more months of warm weather, so here's hoping :)

    xo,Anna

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  14. Anonymous6:31 PM

    Beautiful! Thank you for sharing. I have (had) many of the same in my garden, but this summer between the drought and a terrible invasion of both moles and voles, I have had to rip out many dead plants. Hopefully many self-sowed and will surprise me next year.

    Yep, Laura is right on the blanketflower. Do you have goldfinches where you live? When I don't deadhead my flowers, they love the seedheads on the coneflower and blanketflower--they are especially active late summer during their nesting season.

    Happy gardening! --Becky C.

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  15. Hi Becky :) Here's hoping next year's garden brings you beauty 10fold.

    We did have a nest of GORGEOUS gold finches last summer, I hope they return!

    xo, Anna

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  16. It's a bit tricky, that plant identification thing, and I am always hesitant to do it, especially since I live in a cooler (COLD!) climate. I've only ever seen yellow coreopsis, but I've got that blanket flower in a pot in my backyard!

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  17. You are very good at photography do you know which type of camera you used to take these photos?

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  18. Anonymous2:36 AM

    Winter photography and Lens Accessories chun xia autumn are quite different. Winter light is downy, illumination is lower, in exposure should prevent deficiency. In normal circumstances, and in the winter the exposure should be better than the Photography Equipment spring and autumn period and the two season up level aperture, than summer open big secondary aperture, camera tripod and shutter speed reduce one to level 2, in snow shooting more should prevent underexposure.

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  19. Wow the Echinacea plants you have are so large, have you ever tried to make your own tea out of its dried flowers? Echinacea is well known as a herbal health remedy and is good for colds sinus problems. We brew it and sell it by the truckload ;-)

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  20. Nice blog .. I never thought that you going to write about it:) thanks a lot get cialis

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  21. Love the stepping stone shape. Are you going to add a
    garden shed anytime soon?

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  22. Amazing collection of flowers, just beautiful.

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  23. I hope my garden looks like yours one day.

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